Lewisville Middle School

Lewisville Middle School

Lewisville Middle School
Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools

Lewisville, North Carolina

completion:anticipated 2021
currently:under construction

School

Grades:6-8
Institution:
Capacity:800

Building Area

New Construction:107,600 SF

A growing student population and school overcrowding at the middle level precipitated the development of this new 800-student middle school.

The school will feature learning opportunities integrated into a “knowledge commons" strategy focused area surrounding large open social areas of innovation makerlabs, the media center, STEM lab, administration and guidance suites.

The heavily-wooded site on Robinhood Road in Lewisville, NC features steep and varied terrain, several streams and challenging soil conditions. The site was designed to accommodate an elementary school at some point in the future.

The design complements the compact site development and efficient footprint via a 3-story structure which will take advantage of the terrain for on-grade access while providing expansive views.

McCall Middle School

McCall Middle School

McCall Middle School
Montoursville Area School District

900 Spruce Street
Montoursville, Pennsylvania 17754

School

Institution:
Capacity:922

Building Area

New Construction:6,600 SF
Renovated:142,586 SF
Total:149,186 SF

As the outcome of a District-wide feasibility study performed by McKissick Associates, the Montoursville Area School District renovated the McCall Middle School to accommodate grades 5 through 8. Although the existing building was in fair to good condition, at 40 years of age the building systems had never been updated and the building did not meet handicapped accessibility requirements. The building design included upgrades to accomplish sustainable elements to fulfill the Board's vision. In fulfilling their goal, the project design achieved a rating of two globes under the Green Globes Rating System. A closed loop ground coupled heat pump system serviced by 48,000 vertical lineal feet of wells and 100% heat recovery, assists in meeting the energy efficiency goals. All windows and curtain wall systems were replaced with triple glazed systems.
Internally, the building design included several reconfigurations to provide updated core educational spaces for this 922 pupil capacity facility. A key element of these upgrades included the new library, created through the infilling of an existing two story exterior courtyard. All aspects of this space were developed for sustainability from the use of certified lumber, daylighting to the under floor air distribution. To address the needs for a performance space, a new stage house was constructed while the removal and installation of a raised roof structure in the Cafeteria, which accommodates 700 children and adults for a variety of assemblies and events.

Terra Centre Elementary School

Terra Centre Elementary School

Terra Centre Elementary School
Fairfax County Public Schools

6000 Burke Centre Parkway
Burke, Virginia 22015

completed:2015

School

Capacity:575

Building Area

New Construction:86,140 SF

Terra Centre Elementary School features' include being Earth-Bermed with a Subterranean Courtyard and Atrium; a unique school, Terra Centre is one of two earth-sheltered roof elementary schools in Fairfax County. Getting more light and visual access to the exterior was a priority in renovating the poured in place concrete building. On this tight site, the roof is their playground. A new central clerestory lit atrium allows light to flood the center building while providing a stair and an elevator to access the grass roof playground.

We essentially fit square pegs into round holes, reconfiguring the four circular pods with undersized pie-shaped classrooms into assemblies of larger rectangular classrooms configured along corridors that progressively step back and open to light filled resource areas at the perimeter of the building. A new media center addition was added on the primary street side as a community focal point, and a clerestory lit lobby addition welcomes students and staff at the main entrance. Complete building systems replacement include replacing the VAV HVAC system with water-to-air heat pump system to reduce duct sizes for increased classroom ceiling height.

Hazleton Area Elementary/Middle School

Hazleton Area Elementary/Middle School

Hazleton Area Elementary/Middle School
Hazleton Area School District

1515 West 23rd Street
Hazelton, Pennsylvania 18202

School

Capacity:1106

Building Area

New Construction:10,722 SF
Renovated:128,582 SF
Total:139,304 SF

As part of a comprehensive facilities evaluation for this district, rehabilitation of this former high school (abandoned for more than 10 years) was identified as an expedient and cost-effective option to address rapid student population growth. From the project’s inception, a construction manager was retained to facilitate the fast-track design and construction process. Both before and after bid, extensive value-engineering exercises were undertaken to adjust for discovered conditions and for comprehensive depth in project scope. Subsequently, change orders actually decreased the overall anticipated project cost. Classrooms were enlarged to accommodate modern standards for room sizes as well as to incorporate new technologies. The school's lower level swimming pool was renovated into a cafeteria and kitchen space. Many of the buildings original features were damaged or destroyed during the years while the building remained vacant, including the two towers on either side of the main entrance, which were restored.

Impassioned by both the arts and restoration, McKissick Architecture rallied the local community (who beloved the old building), resulting in a surge of support by residents. Our firm then led the effort to establish a non-profit partnership with several arts organizations to restore the school’s 1,450-seat balconied theatre to its former glory. The proscenium’s gold leaf border was restored and grand Austrian curtain replaced. New seating, theatrical lighting, audio/video equipment, and stage rigging, completed the modernizations of the community’s performing arts center. Named the “Alice Wiltsie Performing Arts Center” within the Hazleton “Castle” School, the inaugural performance hosted iconic band, “Chicago.”

Shikellamy Middle School

Shikellamy Middle School

Shikellamy Middle School
Shikellamy School District

200 Island Blvd.
Sunbury, Pennsylvania 17801

Building Area

New Construction:94,580 SF

The project required McKissick Associates to design a program for a new Middle School facility to relieve overcrowding of other school buildings. After an extensive evaluation of multiple options, the decision was reached to construct the building on the site of the abandoned two-story 62,000 SF C.W. Rice Middle School, closed and decommissioned in 2011. The new middle school was designed to provide three learning communities each containing two teaching teams aligned along a shared core. The site design includes modular wall systems to permit the provision of two competition sports fields on this sloping 8.8 acre site while preserving space for future expansion of 300 pupils. The community's limited finances dictated that the new building be as cost effective and durable as possible. In meeting this goal, McKissick Associates incorporated a number of sustainable building strategies into the design of the 3-story building: earth berming; a structural system utilizing super insulated ICF (insulated concrete form) with plank construction; and rain gardens with underground storm water infiltration. The look and feel of the finished building harmonizes with the architecture and aesthetics of the town by incorporating exterior brick, engineered wood plank siding and a high slope metal roofing system. Operational costs are further minimized through the use of high performance heating and cooling systems with 100% energy recovery. Shikellamy Middle School represents the first Pennsylvania school to use 100% LED interior and exterior lighting systems.

Manoa Elementary School

Manoa Elementary School

Manoa Elementary School
School District of Haverford Township

School

Institution:
Capacity:850

Building Area

New Construction:85,355 SF

This school (designed for students K-5) is located in an affluent suburb of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. With limited open space in this Philadelphia streetcar suburb the only available site was 3.1 acres of a 10-acre community sports complex. The building and site circulation pattern is intentionally compact to maximize the amount of athletic field space that will remain available to the community for sports including lacrosse, soccer, field hockey and football. This neces­sitated a three-story building plan, the use of subsurface storm water detention, as well as, the hard surface playground for event overflow parking. A sub divisible gymnasium room, cafeteria, two music rooms, art room, and fourteen flexible learning spaces provide support for the District's enrichment and special needs programs. Spa­tial efficiency is maximized through dual-use of cafeteria as both stage and sub divisible large group instructional area. A reinforced masonry bearing and precast concrete plank structural system was utilized for the classroom wing to substantially reduce construction time and per­mit the overall height of the building to be limited to 30-feet to meet local zoning requirements. To further reduce the buildings apparent mass within the residential neighborhood, the exterior skin utilizes a mixture of reflective zinc colored metal panels, allowing the three-story build­ing and gymnasium wing to assume the color of the surrounding environment. Internally, the building features an integrated data fiber optic backbone with wireless network­ing and a complete modern voice over IP com­munication system. In additional to portable wireless labs, each classroom has four computers, a mounted LCD projector, as well as a smart board. Green components of the building are cost-effective and protective of the environ­ment. Sustainable features include insulated glass windows and doors, lighting occupancy sensors, high efficiency indirect/direct lighting and day lighting. The acid-etched and sealed concrete floor (in circulation areas) require minimal maintenance while avoiding the use of manmade products.

Williamsport Area Senior High School

Williamsport Area Senior High School

Williamsport Area Senior High School
Williamsport Area School District

2780 West Fourth Street
Williamsport, Pennsylvania 17701

School

Capacity:2780

Building Area

Renovated:513,103 SF

The transformation of Williamsport Area High School included a mixture of educational enhancements, deferred maintenance, and energy saving upgrades. Prioritized upgrades throughout the Facility were made possible with QSCB Funding. The facility was state-of-the-art when it opened in 1972, with the 1999 addition of a Vocational Technical wing, by Vern McKissick, a key feature to enhance its 21st century education pedagogy. The facility was originally built for a student capacity of nearly 3,000 pupils but the student population had dwindled to around 1,600. Educational and curriculum upgrades were undertaken to maximize the building’s classroom usage. The District’s budget constraints had led to an outdated facility in need of maintenance and upgrades, which had multiplied over the years. In the summer of 2011, the WASD Board was advised that the application materials prepared and submitted by McKissick Associates Architects to the PA Department of Education led to an award of $35.3 million of low interest QSCB funding. Therefore, the project provided the District in excess of $17,000,000 in interest savings over the life of the bond issue compared to traditional financing sources. The District then retained McKissick Associates as the design professional for the project. Vern McKissick had worked with the District on over 30 projects since 1989, including three District-wide feasibility studies. Prior evaluations revealed the total cost upgrades required at the building were in the range of $63.5 million. With that in mind, McKissick Architects crafted a carefully balanced project, composed of two project phases: the initial PlanCon/ESCO hybrid project (completed in 2014, it fell within the three year window required by the federal stimulus program), and the second phase to be undertaken in 2019-20 when preexisting School District debt will have been paid down, making funds available to complete the remaining portions of the project.

Windber Area Middle and High School

Windber Area Middle and High School

Windber Area Middle and High School
Windber Area School District

2301 Graham Avenue
Windber, Pennsylvania 15963

completed:2016

School

Capacity:899

Building Area

New Construction:31,821 SF
Renovated:98,500 SF
Total:120,650 SF

Although the Windber Area School District experienced a significant decline in student enrollment (of nearly 70%), at the same time, the aging school facility could no longer meet the educational goals of the District. McKissick Architects developed a strategy to alleviate the District's excess-outdated space by demolition, renovation, and addition. The design was a challenge amid the structure’s tight in-town location/site footprint. Nearly 50% of the original structure was demolished, allowing for site improvement. The site design reconfiguration improves the school’s access and safety, with a new bus loop separate from the automobile circulation lanes, and the addition of 112 parking spaces. The construction of the single two-story addition features pertinent areas, anchored by the Knowledge Commons. This anchor space, which adjoins the Guidance Office, the Library, Administration, Faculty Planning, Dining, and Small Group Study spaces, represents a collaborative area at the heart of the school. Other renovations include the conversion of a former locker room into an 8,300 square foot multi-lab STEM Center, and relocating the District Administration offices to one wing of the building.

Mount Union Junior-Senior High School

Mount Union Junior-Senior High School

Mount Union Junior-Senior High School
Mount Union Area School District

28 West Market Street
Mount Union, Pennsylvania 17066

Building Area

New Construction:27,100 SF
Renovated:142,000 SF
Total:169,100 SF

This project encompasses comprehensive modernization of a mid-century school. Mount Union, located on the Juniata River (at the foot of Jack’s Mountain) was once called the “Silica Brick Capital of the World” amid its three large refractory plants that made brick, used to line steel furnaces and coke ovens. This small (2,500 populous) community had long ago faced economic challenges with the closure of the three brickyards, marking the end of coal mining in the “broad-top” area of Huntingdon County. With an average annual income for families of $21,400, the community continues to face the challenge of creating opportunities for its young people. Faced with a declining enrollment and aging facilities, the Mount Union School District had no choice but to undertake a building program in the late 1990s which resulted in the closure of its 1920s era Mount Union Elementary School. Despite that, increases in program needs, especially for special education, resulted in space needs at the elementary schools. The community also experienced a decline in the business District resulting from the closure of the downtown elementary school. The 1954 Jr/Sr High School had been partially renovated in 1992, but as a very limited renovation project because substantial aid was lost. Working with the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) McKissick Architects secured a variance to the “20-year rule” permitting the project to proceed 8 years earlier than expected. A strong desire existed to better separate junior and senior high age pupils as well as improved educational offerings.

Mifflin County Indian Valley Elementary

Mifflin County Indian Valley Elementary

Mifflin County Indian Valley Elementary
Mifflin County

School

Capacity:875

This project consisted of renovations to convert a former Junior/Senior High School (Kishacoquillis High School) constructed in 1952 into a K-5 elementary center. The building has a capacity of 875 pupils, and was internally reconfigured into two independent schools: a K-3 primary; and 4-5 intermediate elementary.

Former industrial arts shops were converted into an early childhood education center, with additional internal reconfiguration to convert other secondary specialty spaces such as science labs, business labs, locker rooms, etc., into elementary classrooms. Undertaken with limited funding, the project was structured to maximize state PlanCon Aid, with over 50% of the projects cost being provided by the State of Pennsylvania. A design led ESCO project, as envisioned by McKissick Associates, provided $2.1 million in additional funding.

Architectural renovations included asbestos abatement, roof replacement (white EPDM roofing), window replacement, ADA accessibility including new elevator, reconstruction of kitchen and food services areas, relocation of administration offices, and an adjacent health suite. Mechanical renovations included conversion of the building from oil fired steam to propane fired condensing boilers, hot water heating with fan coil classroom units, and rooftop energy recovery ventilation equipment. A partial lighting replacement also occurred as part of the overall energy savings package.

Indiana Area Senior High School

Indiana Area Senior High School

Indiana Area Senior High School
Indiana Area School District

Indiana, Pennsylvania

completed:2016

School

Institution:
Capacity:1320

Building Area

New Construction:35,000 SF

As District Architect of Record, McKissick Associates was tasked with developing a District-Wide Capital Upgrade Plan at all district buildings. A key component of this plan were renovations to the High School to support the introduction of STEM learning pedagogy for 20th century high school education. With total project cost of $7,200,000, the project included the complete reconstruction of approximately 35,000 SF of existing high school space. Key areas slated for modification included the conversion of the Library to a “Cybrary,” creation of a blended learning center to accommodate both traditional and cyber learning pupils, science labs, as well as a complete transformation of the technology educational wing to an open-plan for a 21st century learning center. A total site security upgrade was also included.

Westmont Jr/Sr High School

Westmont Jr/Sr High School

Westmont Hilltop Jr/Sr High School
Westmont Hilltop School District

Johnstown, Pennsylvania

School

Enrollment:1108

Building Area

New Construction:36,510 SF

The Westmont Hilltop High School serves not only as an educational institution but as a touchstone for the community. The public has long embraced the school's identity as an extension of the broader community of Westmont Hilltop. The school's auditorium, blackbox theatre, knowledge commons and even STEAM gallery are widely used for community events. For the students, the commons area is particularly central to daily social interaction for dining, study and project collaboration while the new STEAM center offers progressive 21st century curriculum alternatives that relate advanced learning to practical applications. Just inside the primary student and public entrance, the knowledge commons (amid its unique hexagon carpet tiles of bold reds, greys and blacks) promotes school spirit and solidarity through color identity. This bright and welcoming focal point of school and community activity presents an environment that is exciting and progressive. While the large open knowledge commons serves as a unified student dining area during lunch, the use of color, patterns, and a variety of furnishing types, creates smaller zones within the space that enable socialization and study simultaneously throughout the day. Proximity and visibility of the commons space to both guidance and administration allow passive supervision in support of the all-day use profile. The vibrant colors of the STEAM center generate an energetic, creative atmosphere akin to a collegiate environment. Science labs, maker spaces, innovation labs and art studios surround a central STEAM gallery where students display their work and gather for critique or discussion. Flexible furnishings in the adjoining common study lab support multiple learning styles and student projects in a space that is conducive to both independent study and collaboration. The STEAM program and its welcoming environment introduces Westmont-Hilltop's students to collegiate-style learning where students can see themselves embracing a future that includes higher education.

Williamsport Area Middle School

Williamsport Area Middle School

Williampsort Area Middle School
Williamsport Area School District

Williamsport, Pennsylvania

completed:2014

School

Enrollment:1398

Building Area

New Construction:94,000 SF
Renovated:94,000 SF
Total:188,000 SF

Initially slated for demolition, this reconstructed and expanded facility has earned a LEED™ Silver rating. Originally constructed in 1951, the school was unique for its poured in place concrete construction of walls, floors, and roofing. Designed to support the 1940s view of junior high school instruction, the inflexible environment was an obstruction to modern middle school programming. A new rear classroom portion of the building was constructed to provide advanced science classrooms, teaching and athletic support space. The configuration now allows teaching team separation of grade level instruction. Contributions to the sustainable character of the facility include upgrades to the exterior building envelope, replacing the existing window units with triple glazed window/curtain wall assemblies, LED lighting, and the installation of energy-recovery ventilation coupled to a ground source geothermal heat pump HVAC system, with a total of 175 400’ deep-closed loop wells.

Caldwell County Granite Falls Middle School

Caldwell County Granite Falls Middle School

Caldwell County Granite Falls Middle School
Caldwell County Schools

90 North Main Street
Granite Falls, North Carolina 28630

Evaluation

Site Coverage:100481 SF

School

Institution:
Capacity:825

Building Area

New Construction:53,882 SF
Renovated:46,599 SF
Total:100,481 SF

The historic, yet aged, Granite Falls Middle School, fully integrated into the local neighborhood and beloved by its community, could no longer keep pace with the needs of a 21st century education. A strategy and design were developed by McKissick Architects to replace parts of the school, renovate, update, and adapt other areas while maintaining particular historic areas, such as the free-standing auditorium and gymnasium buildings, which will be restored yet equipped with modern upgrades. The phased plan enables continued use of the site, as well as reduces the cost of construction, bringing the project scope within the county's budget. The skeleton of the original 1930s school will remain; however, the interior will be entirely reconfigured as the “Technotorium,” a project-based learning center with studies to include robotics, programming, electronics, hydroponics, among other standard STEM offerings. A focal point of the design is the 230-year-old historic white oak where generations of students have rested under its branches. Not only will the tree be maintained, additional precautions are being undertaken to ensure that the tree will both survive and thrive throughout the construction, far into the future.

Conover School for Exceptional Children

Conover School for Exceptional Children

Conover School for Exceptional Children
Newton-Conover City Schools

108 7th Street Place SW
Conover, North Carolina 28613

completed:2019
currently:under construction

School

Grades:Pre-K - Adult
Institution:
Capacity:180

Building Area

New Construction:7,000 SF
Renovated:32,000 SF
Total:39,000 SF

The Conover School, a public separate school (serving three school systems) for students with exceptional needs and disabilities, under the administration of the Newton-Conover City School System, is located in Conover, North Carolina. Enrollment includes about 100 profoundly affected students (ranging in age from 3 to 21, with over 50% wheelchair bound) who are divided among fourteen homerooms. A new addition expands the cafeteria, food service and kitchen areas, and provides a new gymnasium. Renovations included an expanded life skills area, improved corridor access, and expanded special mobility-equipment storage, so this aging school could better accommodate the Districts' most exceptional students.

Westmont Hilltop Elementary School

Westmont Hilltop Elementary School

Westmont Hilltop Elementary School
Westmont Hilltop School District

827 Diamond Boulevard
Johnstown, Pennsylvania 15905

completed:2017

School

Grades:K-6
Institution:
Capacity:900

Building Area

New Construction:61,450 SF
Renovated:33,320 SF
Total:94,770 SF

The new Westmont Hilltop Elementary School was the outcome of a prior district-wide optimization plan that called for the realignment of the district’s grade-level structure. The resulting new school is located on the site of the former Westmont Hilltop Middle School which was demolished as part of the project. The available area for the new building was extremely limited as the site also houses the high school sports field/track complex. Substantial site reconfiguration was needed to better accommodate separation between cars, buses, and pedestrians.
Located in the historic district of Luzerne Street (a nationally registered streetscape) a careful selection of materials including stone, cement board clapboard, brick, and metal panels harmonizes the neighborhood's vernacular. The resulting solution entails construction of a high performance 3-story ICF (Insulated Concrete Form) classroom building. The building is functionally configured by floor into three schools: kindergarten, grades 1 to 3, and then grades 4 to 6. Upper level classrooms “paired” by subject matter, science and math, and then, English and social studies. To contain costs, the gymnasium wing of the former middle school was retained and incorporated into the new bThe new Westmont Hilltop Elementary School was the outcome of a prior district-wide optimization plan that called for the realignment of the district’s grade-level structure. The resulting new school is located on the site of the former Westmont Hilltop Middle School which was demolished as part of the project. The available area for the new building was extremely limited as the site also houses the high school sports field/track complex. Substantial site reconfiguration was needed to better accommodate separation between cars, buses, and pedestrians.

Located in the historic district of Luzerne Street (a national registry of historic streetscapes), a careful selection of materials including stone, cement board clapboard, brick, and metal panels harmonizes the neighborhood's vernacular. The resulting solution entails construction of a high performance 3-story ICF (Insulated Concrete Form) classroom building. The building is functionally configured by floor into three schools: kindergarten, grades 1 to 3, and then grades 4 to 6. Upper level classrooms were “paired” by subject matter, science and math, and then, English and social studies. To contain costs, the gymnasium wing of the former middle school was retained and incorporated into the new building. The gymnasium itself now houses a smaller gym, performance stage, cafeteria, kitchen, and updated locker rooms. Former shop areas (from the 1977 metal building structure) made way for a new STEM Learning Center, including a vocal and instrumental music suite, computer labs, art, and library space.

Reading “Castle” Intermediate High School

Reading “Castle” Intermediate High School

Reading Intermediate High School
Reading School District

215 North 12th Street
Reading, Pennsylvania 19604

completed:2012

School

Grades:9-10
Institution:
Capacity:3100

Building Area

New Construction:122,187 SF
Renovated:189,176 SF
Total:311,363 SF

McKissick Associates was asked to review the reuse of this functioning hospital following the Catholic Church’s decision to construct a replacement building. McKissick developed a plan that entailed a phased public-private partnership for the conversion of the building into a magnet school. The urban 8.3-acre St. Joseph’s site was completely transformed through the demolition of 250,000 SF. Original walls (including a four-story high stone chapel, a bell tower and 30” thick stone walls) were incorporated as exterior elements in the new additions. Existing hospital areas were converted to classroom use, while more than 122,187 SF of new construction accommodates large group instruction areas, a cafeteria, food service area, a kitchen, locker rooms, a gymnasium, band/choral rooms, a black box theatre, and an internet café. Waste material from demolition was used to create a hillside playing field.

The building was designed to create a small supportive learning environment. Construction of an additional story, above an existing building, houses four standalone (grades 9-10) school programs arranged around the District’s newly developed magnet programs: Arts and Humanities, International Business, Technology, and Agriculture Ecology and Science. Each of the four 600 student schools-within-a-school were arranged to be self-contained. Taking advantage of the natural slope (over 160-foot drop over a three-block distance), no student must move more than two stories to reach their respective core educational facilities.

Summerfield Elementary School

Summerfield Elementary School

Summerfield Elementary School
Guilford County Schools

7501 Summerfield Road
Summerfield, North Carolina

completed:2012

School

Grades:K-5
Institution:
Capacity:700
Core Capacity:850

Building Area

New Construction:52,400 SF
Renovated:42,000 SF
Total:94,400 SF

Summerfield Elementary School had consisted of 21 different buildings constructed between 1940 and 1985 including 14 modular classrooms. Not only does this 8.8-acre site lie within the town of Summerfield’s historic overlay district, but one of the site buildings (which also serves as the community gymnasium) was a treasured historic structure. The site was challenging, bisected by a high tension 14.4 KVA power company line, and seven septic drain fields which could not be disturbed, two community baseball fields, an inactive AMTRAK right-of-way, a Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) memorial, and was the site of a Revolutionary War battle. It turned out that the site’s most buildable area also hosted an elevated water tower. Unlike prior building projects, this project was envisioned as a total reconstruction of the site. The solution to maximizing the buildable area was a two-story classroom wing with the creation of an internal kindergarten play courtyard. Extensive green features have been utilized in the design, driven by necessity as much as responsibility. The building itself is primarily ICF (insulated concrete form) construction in order to create a high-performing envelope. This method of construction also allows for a faster-paced construction schedule.

The Centrum

This wide lobby is the intersection of the two large public spaces: the cafeteria and library, and accommodates the high traffic of lunch changes and assemblies. The window seating bench allows this space to be used as a teaching area. The floor map fills a 27′ diameter circle where the main corridor’s gathering area looks into the kindergarten courtyard at the entrance to the cafeteria and the library. The blue circle above represents the dome of the sky.

The World from Summerfield...

This junction is also home to the school’s map of the world as centered on Summerfield, North Carolina which is identified by the red star. The map is a custom waterjet pattern using vinyl enhanced floor tile. This map may look a bit unusual because it was created from an equidistant azimuthal projection. That means that distances can be measured on a uniform scale from the center of the map to any other point along the radius.

It's a small world afterall...

This type of map is similar to great circle maps which are typically drawn looking down on the poles or from a point on the equator. This map differs in that the exact center of the map is the Summerfield Elementary School. Cities can be located on the map by calculating their distance from Summerfield, NC and locating them along the appropriate bearing. The map is oriented by the compass so that “north” on the map points north.

The floor map can be used as a tool for mathematics, geography, geometry and social studies.

Azimuthal equidistant what?

The floor map is designed so that places within 5,000 miles of Summerfield can be located on the map using a common scale when measured from Summerfield (at the center). This is called an “azimuthal equidistant projection”.

On this map, 21’ is equal to about 10,000 miles, so the scale factor is 1 foot = 477.213 miles. You can determine how far away a place is and its bearing (by using geometry or one of the many online resources) and then locate it on the map.

The Map Chain

Our interior designer (who has a great fondness for maps) created this map chain in order to illustrate how the map works. By placing the red star at the one end of the chain over the red star at the map center and extending the chain to the outside of the circle (as an airplane might fly), a number of cities can be seen according to their proximity to Summerfield. Each city tag has a bearing listed, so if the chain is aligned along the bearing angle, the city can be located on the floor map.

The chain itself has a marking at each foot (1 through 11) to assist in adding other cities to the chain in the future. Several other charms mark the chain as well. The globe marks the geographic north pole. The magnetic north pole is marked by a locket so that as the pole migrates, the information inside can be updated. The chain also has a working watch charm which is located at Greenwich, England, UK. It has been set for Greenwich Mean Time (or Zulu time).

Which way from here?

Distances were calculated using the website:http://distancecalculator.globefeed.com/World_Distance_Calculator.asp

McKissick Architecture is Platinum Sponsor of A4LE NC Conference Held in Winston-Salem, NC!

McKissick Architecture is Platinum Sponsor of A4LE NC Conference Held in Winston-Salem, NC!

McKissick Architecture was the Platinum Sponsor at this year’s North Carolina Association for Learning Environments annual conference – themed “Building Bridges for Education”. For the first time, the conference was held in Winston-Salem, North Carolina – where McKissick Architecture has its office.

We’re so proud to have so many people in the educational planning world in our town to see the fantastic changes that have been happening here in Winston-Salem. People who haven’t been to this city in 5 or 10 years will see so many changes! And the positive energy and effort underlying the successes here in our city and especially in our own neighborhood of the Innovation Quarter, really represent the kind of positive changes that can be effected in the education arena.

-Kristen McKissick

About A4LE

The Association for Learning Environments is a non-profit association whose sole mission is improving the places where children learn.
The Association for Learning Environments was first established in 1921 as the National Council on Schoolhouse Construction (NCSC) then becoming Council of Education Facility Planners International (CEFPI) in 1971. It took its current name in 2015.

A4LE Tenets:

  • Facilities impact the learning, development and behavior of the facility user;
  • The planning process is essential for quality facilities;
  • Sharing and networking improves the planning process; and
  • There is a standard by which to measure.

In addition to participating as a conference sponsor, McKissick Architecture was represented by Vern McKissick (an accredited educational planner by the A4LE organization) as a session speaker where he addressed planners and educators on strategies for developing specialized program STEM space within existing buildings.

Penn State Altoona Edith Eve Chapel

Penn State Altoona Edith Eve Chapel

Penn State Altoona: Edith Eve Chapel Renovations
Pennsylvania State University

300 Ivyside Park
Altoona, Pennsylvania 16601

completed:2017

Building Area

Renovated:2,992 SF

McKissick Associates was asked to review the reuse of this functioning hospital following the Catholic Church’s decision to construct a replacement building. McKissick developed a plan that entailed a phased public-private partnership for the conversion of the building into a magnet school. The urban 8.3-acre St. Joseph’s site was completely transformed through the demolition of 250,000 SF. Original walls (including a four-story high stone chapel, a bell tower and 30” thick stone walls) were incorporated as exterior elements in the new additions. Existing hospital areas were converted to classroom use, while more than 122,187 SF of new construction accommodate large group instruction areas, cafeteria, food service kitchens, locker rooms, gymnasium, band/choral rooms, black box theatre and internet café. Waste material from demolition used to create a hillside playing field.

The building was programmed to create a small supportive learning environment. Construction of an additional story above an existing building created four standalone grade 9-10 school programs arranged around the District’s newly developed magnet programs: Arts and Humanities, International Business, Technology, and Agriculture Ecology and Science. Each of these 600 student schools-within-a-school are arranged to be self-contained. Taking advantage of the natural slope (over 160-foot drop over a three-block distance), no student is required to move more than two stories to reach core educational facilities.

Penn Highlands Community College Blair Campus at Logan Valley Mall

Penn Highlands Community College Blair Campus at Logan Valley Mall

Blair Campus at the Logan Valley Mall
Penn Highlands Community College

5580 Goods Lane, Suite 700
Altoona, Pennsylvania 16602

completed:2018

School

Institution:

Building Area

Renovated:15,175 SF

McKissick Associates determined program feasibility and planning as well as architectural design for adaptation of a small on-site program delivery campus for Penn Highlands Community College within a large, regional shopping mall. The storefront campus houses over 18,000 SF of educational and student community space. An interconnecting stair provides internal access to both floors of teaching space and serves as an organizational core for socialization and collaboration spaces central to this location. The design takes advantage of the linear nature of the central mall circulation to present a long, glass front façade (along the inside) allowing the student commons and study spaces to be highly visible. A color palette of deep teal, oranges, fresh greens and yellow were used to create a youthful and vibrant environment easily visible from the mall's main promenade, which was intended to serve as an appealing invitation for potential students. Furnishings were selected for flexibility, variety, and comfort. Lounges, club chairs and table groupings (of various heights) provide options for inclusive collaboration between groups (of all sizes) within the largest student lounge. A smaller lounge area with traditional computer counters allows for more focused study, where soft furnishings in non-social configurations provide ideal ambiance for individualized, concentrated study.

CPI SciTech New Health Sciences Building

CPI SciTech New Health Sciences Building

Health Sciences Flagship Building
Central Pennsylvania Institute of Science & Technology

Belefonte, Pennsylvania

completed:2020
currently:design development

School

Grades:13-14
Institution:

Building Area

New Construction:45,800 SF

The Central Pennsylvania Institute of Science and Technology is a major source of technical training in Centre County and the surrounding areas. What started as a vocational-technical school in the 1960s has grown to offer 18 secondary programs, over 60 in-house adult and continuing education programs, and over 350 online courses. The new Health Sciences Building is being constructed to accommodate the growth of healthcare-related specialties and the additional programming in healthcare management, medical assistance, LPN/RN, nurses aid, surgical technology, occupational therapy, and physical therapy.

The sustainable design includes a three-story structure to include two stories of academic areas (labs, classrooms, technology spaces), as well as autonomous facilities and entrances (on the ground floor) for professional suites, labs, and offices of third-party healthcare partners. This allows autonomy of academic and professional space while providing students an opportunity for hands-on experience in a true professional setting. By combining extensive academics with hands-on technical training, graduates will leave CPI with high levels of competency in their field. Additionally, the new facility will serve as a new campus hub for student life as the school continues to add programming and increase its post-secondary degree offerings.

McKissick Associates MCK Architecture